successful landing page

Anatomy of a Successful Landing Page

By Princess Jones

Landing pages can be useful sales tools when you’re promoting a product, a mailing list, or anything else you want to put in the spotlight. The landing page becomes the home base for your marketing efforts. Whether it’s a tweet or a link in a bio, you have a place to send your prospects.

Once you’ve gotten them there, it’s time to get the sale. The most successful landing pages have some similar elements. If you use them wisely, you’ll see it affect your conversion rates in a positive way.

Call(s) to Action

The most important part of your landing page is your call to action (CTA). The CTA tells your audience what you want them to do. No marketing message is complete without one, but a landing page without a CTA is dead in the water. The whole point of a landing page is to direct the reader take you up on it.

You aren’t limited to just one CTA, either. In fact, you’ll probably be more successful if you sprinkle multiple CTAs through the copy. Some of your readers won’t need the whole spiel to make the decision to move forward. Give them the option to say yes at every turn.

Benefits, Not Features

Copy is an important factor in successful landing page. Of course, you’ll want it to be smart, well-written, and on message. But it’s extremely important to concentrate on benefits, not features.

Benefits and features are two sides of the same coin. A feature is something your product or service does. A benefit is what your customer gets from the thing your product or service does. Customers don’t care about what your product or service does. They only care about what it does for them.

A feature of a meal delivery service is that its staff brings your food right to your door. A benefit is that the customer doesn’t have get dressed and drive over to pick up her own takeout food. A feature of an in-home chef is that he will clean up the kitchen after he’s done. A benefit of an in-home chef is that the customer eats well and then doesn’t have to argue about who’s gonna do the dishes. See the difference?

Get Visual

They say no one reads anymore, but that’s not exactly true. It’s more like people read only what they want or have to read. So don’t lean too much on copy for your landing page. Use visuals that evoke the same tone as the overall page. Images of the products, people using the service, or staff members always go over well. Infographics can help get your point across, too. Make call to action visuals pop against the others because you want them to stand out.

Less is More

A landing page is kinda like having a door-to-door salesman–except this one goes from Internet browser to browser. There’s an old saying in sales: Don’t talk yourself out of a sale. All this means is that once you’ve got the sale, shut up. The more you talk, the more opportunity you give your prospect to change his mind about saying yes.

When you’re putting together the copy and visuals for your landing page, give your readers just enough information to say yes. It’s not the time to answer every possible question about the product. (That’s what a FAQ page is for!) It’s not the time to list every single benefit. Distill it all down into digestible pieces and don’t over serve your guests.

Subscribe to the Small Business Bonfire Newsletter
And get your free one-page marketing plan template.
Princess Jones on DeviantartPrincess Jones on FacebookPrincess Jones on GooglePrincess Jones on LinkedinPrincess Jones on Twitter
Princess Jones
Princess Jones is the evil genius behind P.S. Jones Copy & Design, where she helps food and drink businesses speak the language of their audiences. For more talk about copywriting, design, and the tools to pull them off, follow her on Twitter @imprincessjones.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.